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SERIES

MIZNA FILM SERIES

Fourth Wednesdays at the Trylon

The Mizna Film Series is a monthly selection of Southwest Asian/North African (SWANA) film programming curated by Mizna, a St. Paul–based, Arab American arts nonprofit that publishes a biannual Arab American literary journal and presents the annual Twin Cities Arab Film Festival each fall. The Mizna Film Series expands Mizna’s regular programming to include repertory screenings, critical essays, filmmaker interviews, and discussions, exploring documentary, narrative, and non-narrative filmmaking practices and aesthetics from the SWANA region and beyond.

The Mizna Film Series screens classic and contemporary works by SWANA artists at the Trylon on the fourth Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. Ticket prices vary. If you miss a screening, most films are available on Mizna’s virtual cinema following the in-person screening.

Mizna’s 2022 Twin Cities Arab Film Festival returns to the Trylon September 29–October 2! The Arab Film Festival debuts independent narrative, documentary, and experimental films from more than fifteen Arabic-speaking countries and their diasporas. The festival brings contemporary film from SWANA filmmakers. This year’s festival program engages and interrogates diaspora as experience and filmmaking practice, and each film questions what it means to seek home or family in a place one has never visited; to find home in the foreign, borrowed, or temporary; or to see oneself as both in and outside the places we call home. Join Mizna for powerful stories from SWANA artists representing themselves and their world through film. More details coming soon at https://www.trylon.org/films/category/miznas-16th-twin-cities-arab-film-festival/

JE VEUX VOIR + BARMEH

BARMEH (ROUNDS) (2001, DCP, 8m, Lebanon, Arabic w/ English) dir Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige. Rounds is a video featuring Rabih Mroué, filmed driving through the streets of the city. Beirut is evoked through the driver’s stories and through sound, but the city is never seen; it is rendered invisible in an overexposed whiteness. However, […]

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